Fundacion PRISMA (Regional Program of Research on Development and the Environment)

PRISMA is a regional center for dialogue and research on development and environment, founded in 1992, with a mission to generate and mobilize knowledge to strengthen the livelihoods and territorial governance processes led by rural communities and indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica, one of the most unequal and insecure regions of the world. Climate change has reinforced the historical patterns of political, social and economic exclusion of rural populations, while exacerbating dynamics of degradation.

PRISMA’s institutional goal is to contribute to strengthening territorial governance in Mesoamerica in the context of climate change. Accordingly, PRISMA’s focuses on related topics, such as territorial and landscape governance, rights, mitigation and adaptation, food security, transformation of agricultural and productive processes, economic dynamics, as well as other relevant topics for the region.

PRISMA conducts 5 principal lines of work: i) the generation of relevant, independent and rigorous research that informs processes and policies ii) the promotion of collaboration and critical thinking in multi-level dialogues that builds linkages and synergies among different actors, perspectives, and positions; iii) partnership (acompañamiento) with territorial actors and authorities in their efforts to drive endogenous change; iv) strategic communications efforts to disseminate key messages targeted at specific opportunities for change; and v) the training of a new generation of leaders committed to social and institutional change. These lines of work are organized into two programs covering distinct geographical areas in order to respond more effectively to the distinct dynamics and challenges facing two subregions of Mesoamerica: the Caribbean and the Pacific (including national level work in El Salvador). Currently, PRISMA accompanies the agendas of the Mesoamerican Alliance of People and Forests, an alliance of territorial authorities that govern the bulk of the region's forests, as part of its Caribbean agenda, while the Pacific Agenda works with the Program of Regional Rural Dialogue (a platform of Central American family agriculture organizations) and in El Salvador with organizations and territorial associations, as well as public officials and other allies.